Our message to our customers, is that we deliver 'Great care, great fare'. And the face of that care is our cabin crew. They are, and always have been, renowned for their friendliness, their concern, their natural ability to put their passengers at ease and to ensure that the experience of flying with us is a pleasant memorable one. That is why our Cabin Crew are so important. They represent Aer Lingus. In so many people's minds, they actually ARE Aer Lingus.

Aer Lingus Careers

Our cabin crew care deeply about our passengers. Our cabin crew are passionate about safety and service. They wear our uniform with pride, conscious at all times that they are the face of Aer Lingus.

If you want to join us, we are looking for customer focussed people who are confident and assured. You need to thrive in a team, even though that team might be different every day. When the flight takes off, you'll need to be able to deal with whatever issues might arise.

 

FAQ on Cabin Crew

If I am Aer Lingus Cabin Crew, will I see the world?

Only on your own time. Aer Lingus Cabin Crew rarely leave the airports they fly to, apart from those on the long haul flights to the USA.

What does the job involve?

The job involves keeping every passenger safe, while making their day special. We want it to be.

No day is the same however, and issues do arise aboard a flight, issues which our Cabin crew must deal with. It could be that on any given day, you are called upon to be a counsellor, a nurse, a maitre d, a waiter or waitress.

What about the hours?

The hours are varied. There is a 24/7 commitment, so you must be flexible. And there is always the possibility that delays beyond your control may extend your hours. Safety always comes first, so if you are part of a crew, you need to be able to accept that the plane may not take off on time, and you may not make it home for that important occasion.

Are there basic requirements for cabin crew jobs?

We expect all our Cabin Crew to have

  • excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • strong emotional intelligence skills
  • well developed team work skills with leadership potential
  • proven customer service skills
  • awareness of our customer expectations

We also expect our Cabin crew to be:

  • Self-motivated, flexible and adaptable
  • Professional, with a positive attitude to work
  • Aware of commercial opportunities in an ever changing environment

It is essential that our cabin crew would:

  • Be at least 19 by the closing date of application
  • Possess a current passport which allows unrestricted travel in and out of foreign countries
  • Be prepared to undertake a pre-selection training course which could last up to 7 weeks
  • Be able to speak, read and write English
  • Have at least 2 years experience in a direct Customer Service environment or equivalent

Anything else? What about a foreign language? Is that a requirement?

It is not a requirement, but it is certainly an advantage if you are fluent in another major European language such as Spanish, Italian, German or French.

Would I have to be a certain size or weight for the job? Is there an Aer Lingus 'look'?

The Aer Lingus look is professional.  We require our Cabin Crew to wear our uniform with pride.
In terms of physical requirements, you need to be between 5’2” and 6’2” tall with weight in proportion, so that we can be sure your ability to carry out all the tasks required will not be impacted or hindered.  We also need our crew to be able to stretch to reach 6 feet, 3 inches or higher.

The job is demanding physically, so to be a member of our Cabin Crew, you will need to be fit.  You must be able to stand for long periods of time, to push/pull/lift objects weighing up to 18 kg, to push/pull/move beverage carts weighing up to 100 kg, and to reach all emergency equipment onboard the aircraft and and fit comfortably in the crew seat.

How do I prove I am fit enough for the job? Do I need to be able to swim?

If you are offered a job as Cabin Crew, it will be dependent on you passing a few other tests.  You will have to be able to pass a post-offer medical and prove that you are a competent swimmer, able to swim 25 metres in a pool and tread water.

What if I have a visible tattoo or piercing?

You must always look professional in the uniform.  You must be willing to adhere to all our uniform standards.  They include that no tattoos, body piercings or tongue rings are visible while you are in uniform.   Tattoos may not be covered with adhesive bandages or by other methods, to render them not visible.

Do I need perfect sight for the job?

The vision requirement is that 20/40 corrected should not be exceeded. You do need to pass a sight test, but you will be allowed to wear glasses or contact lenses for this.

Tell me about the training please?

Initial training takes approximately seven weeks and is based in Dublin. The first five weeks are mainly classroom based, after which you will put your learning into practice on board our aircraft. If you successfully pass our assessment at this stage, you will fly with more experienced crew members for another 3 months at which point you will be passed as fully qualified. You will also receive additional training at least once per year.

Is there much study involved? What will I need to learn about?

There is quite a lot of study involved. You will receive a home study pack before you attend cabin crew training. When training starts, you will be covering subjects such as aircraft layout, emergency procedures and evacuations, first aid and CPR, self-defence, hazardous materials, security, aviation regulations, company policy and procedures, appearance standards, in-flight service, customer service, interpersonal skills and special passenger handling.

Will I be paid while I am training?

You will be paid while you are training.

What about terms and conditions and benefits?

Aer Lingus offers its Cabin Crew a very generous and competitive benefits package. Find out more here.


Is Cabin Crew for Me?

Do you love people noticing when you have done a good job, and acknowledging it?

Yes

We all love praise and acknowledgement but this could be a problem. You will probably not find a queue of people waiting at the end of the day to tell you that you did a great job. You need to be able to finish your day knowing yourself that it was a good day's work, and taking your own pride in that.

No

That's good. It is unlikely that people will be lining up at the end of the day to tell you that you did a great job. You need to be the sort of person who gets satisfaction from knowing it for yourself. You need to finish every day knowing that you delivered great care with great warmth to our passengers and be happy with that.

Are you the sort of person who likes to have a lot of people around you, a lot of the time?

Yes

That's good. This is not a job which offers much by way of quiet time or space. It is a job for someone who loves being surrounded by lots of different people, both customers and colleagues. It is a job for someone who is passionate about service, and who wants to be part of a great team.

No

Many of us feel the need sometimes to 'get away from it all'. But if you are part of Aer Lingus' Cabin Crew, you will never 'get away from it all' while you are at work. No one says this is a lonely job. It's for people who like to have a lot of different people around them, customers and colleagues, all of the time.

Do you feel good about yourself, and you know that you come across as confident and assured?

Yes

Great. This is a job for someone at ease with themselves. It is essential that Aer Lingus Cabin Crew both look and are, confident and self-assured. Passengers need to believe that the crew members taking care of them on a flight are resourceful and calm, and that they will be able to deal with whatever arises. When the door of the plane closes, the Cabin crew are in charge of the passengers' welfare. Your calm and confident demeanour can make a very big difference to the quality of a nervous or worried passenger's experience.

No

Some of us feel good about ourselves inside, but don't necessarily project a lot of confidence or self-assurance. It is essential however that Aer Lingus Cabin Crew both are, and appear, confident and self-assured. When the door of the plane closes, they are in charge of the passengers' welfare, and they need to be able to deal with whatever arises. They need both to be resourceful and reassuring, and to appear so.

Word comes through of a technical problem, just as you are preparing to fly home from Madrid. The delay is likely to be of at least 4 hours. Will you find it really hard to stop thinking about the party you are now likely to miss?

Yes

This is an understandable response. None of us likes to have our plans disrupted. But it does sometimes happen that, either because of weather or a technical issue, a flight gets delayed.

As an Aer Lingus crew member, you have to be prepared for situations like this and remain flexible and positive.

Remember, when you eventually take off, the aircraft is going to be full of people whose plans have also been disrupted. You need to be able to focus all your energy on remaining pleasant, understanding and helpful in the face of their frustration.

No

That's great. You really do need to be able to put aside your own feelings of frustration in situations like this.

Delays sometimes do happen, and when they do, you and the rest of your Cabin Crew team will be the people listening to, and reassuring, a whole aircraft full of people who also had plans for the evening.

You need to be positive as you help each other prepare for that, so that you can focus all your energy on remaining pleasant, understanding and helpful in the face of their frustration.

The job of Cabin Crew is ever changing. No day is the same. Are you the type of person who can cope with a mix of early starts, late starts, weekends on, and weekends off?

Yes

That’s great. Your day might start as early as 3.30am, or as late as 4pm.  The pattern will also change.  So to work as Cabin Crew in Aer Lingus you do really need to be the sort of person who thrives on change.

No day is the same.  No shift is the same.

Aer Lingus Cabin Crew are the sort of people who understand that to report for work at 5am looking good, and ‘wearing the uniform with pride’, they will have need to have had a very early night, and an even earlier wake up call, perhaps a few times a week! They are the sort of people who enjoy changing shift patters, long term.

No

We understand. It is difficult to start work at a different time every day.  Lots of us thrive on routine.  But there is little or no routine associated with the job of Cabin Crew.

Changing shifts and work times are at the very heart of the job. 

But in this job, the 5am shift doesn’t really just start at 5.  It actually starts with a really early night the night before, and getting up early enough on the day to arrive at work at 5, looking good and  ‘wearing the uniform with pride’ -  perhaps a couple of times a week!

You know that you will be working as a team, every time you fly. And you love being part of a team. But do you like your team to stay the same?

Yes

Lots of people build up a terrific team spirit with their colleagues. And they love to be able to stick with the same team. But that's not the way it is with Cabin Crew.

Every time you fly, you will be with a team, but it will be a different team. So you need to be able, and prepared, to build a great team spirit afresh, every time you fly with a different set of people.

No

Great. You are the team player who loves that the team keeps changing. That is what we need at Aer Lingus.

Every day you fly you are likely to be flying with a different team of people. And every day, you need to have the energy and enthusiasm to build a real team spirit, for just that day, with your Cabin Crew. You need to be willing to forge a strong bond. Of course the good thing is that this bond is what leads to the real sense of community among the cabin crew at Aer Lingus.

People don't necessarily work together often, but they always work together wholeheartedly.

Sometimes it feels as if the job of Cabin Crew is never done. There is always one more task on the list, or one more passenger in need of care or attention. Do your standards sometimes slip a little when you are really busy or if you don't get a bit of recovery time?

Yes

That is really understandable, but our Cabin Crew need to deliver a consistently high service, even when they are busy.

There are very few quiet times on a flight, so cabin crew need to be able to maintain their energy and enthusiasm all the time. They need to like being busy.

No

Great. If you work with us as a member of the Cabin Crew, you will be very busy almost all the time.

There is no quiet time to regroup, just a constant stream of tasks which must be carried out, while at the same time, passengers need service and reassurance.

This is a job for someone who loves to be busy all the time, but who never ever forgets that in every interaction with one of his/her passengers, he/she is the face of our airline.

We all know that life happens. Are you ever late?

Yes

Of course you are sometimes late. We all are. Life happens, the alarm clock doesn't go off, the cat gets sick during the night, the traffic is bad.

But Aer Lingus carries over 10 million passengers a year, so we need to be able to rely on every single crew member to be on time.

The times at which you will need to report are very precise. If you miss them, you will frustrate your colleagues, and it is even possible that a flight might be delayed. The knock on effects of this can be huge, both in human and financial terms.

The ability to be absolutely precise and rigid in terms of shift-attendance reliability, while at the same time being flexible, pleasant and totally customer focused while on the job gets to the very core of what this job is about.

No

No? Not ever?

OK, we believe you, and we really like that you clearly see the importance of being on time.

We carry over 10 million passengers a year, so we need to be able to rely on every single crew member to be on time, every single time.

If you work with us, the times at which you will need to report are very precise. If you miss them, you will frustrate your colleagues, and it is even possible that a flight might be delayed. The knock on effects of this can be huge, both in human and financial terms.

The ability to be absolutely precise and rigid in terms of shift-attendance reliability, while at the same time being flexible, pleasant and totally customer focused while on the job, gets to the very core of what this job is about.

You and your pals have finally managed to find a time to get away for a few days, but then your schedule comes out, and you are working. Do you ring every single person you know for a swop?

Yes

Everybody looks for swops sometimes. Work life balance is balance is important but sometimes situations arise which just cannot be avoided. This really is not the job for someone who finds it hard to accept that they may miss out on life outside the job. Cabin crew need to stay motivated to give everything to the job even when a few situations like this arise in a row.

No

No? Not ever?

That's good. It's important to recognise that it's not a good idea to look for a change or a swop every time the schedule doesn't suit your friends, or your life outside Aer Lingus. Work life balance is important, but this is a job is for someone who gets a lot of satisfaction and motivation from the job itself, and who accepts that the time and shift demands will mean missing out on some aspects of life outside of it.

So at the end of the day, it's all about team work and great customer service, right?

Yes

Sorry, trick question. The answer is No. At the end of the day, it's not actually all about team work, or even all about passenger satisfaction. It's all about safety.

The essence of what Aer Lingus sets out to do is to fly people safely from one destination to another. We invest a huge amount of time in training our people for situations we hope will never arise.

Our cabin crew need to be motivated to take that training really seriously and to take seriously too, the need to get passengers to adhere to safety procedures.

We need people who are happy to work hard to develop skills they hope never to have to use, but who will, if they DO have to use them, react in a calm, reassuring manner, and demonstrate real leadership to the passengers who are depending on them.

No

Correct. Well done on spotting the trick question. At the end of the day, it's not actually all about team work, or even all about passenger satisfaction. It's all about safety.

The essence of what Aer Lingus sets out to do is to fly people safely from one destination to another. We invest a huge amount of time in training our people for situations we hope will never arise.

Our cabin crew need to be motivated to take that training really seriously and to take seriously too, the need to get passengers to adhere to safety procedures.

We need people who are happy to work hard to develop skills they hope never to have to use, but who will, if they DO have to use them, react in a calm, reassuring manner, and demonstrate real leadership to the passengers who are depending on them. .